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Coyotes-Wolves-Cougars.blogspot.com

Grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, cougars/ mountain lions,bobcats, wolverines, lynx, foxes, fishers and martens are the suite of carnivores that originally inhabited North America after the Pleistocene extinctions. This site invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on that suite of native animals (predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our "Wild America" as well as subjective commentary from expert and layman alike. All of the above being revealed and discussed with the underlying goal of one day seeing our Continent rewilded.....Where big enough swaths of open space exist with connective corridors to other large forest, meadow, mountain, valley, prairie, desert and chaparral wildlands.....Thereby enabling all of our historic fauna, including man, to live in a sustainable and healthy environment. - Blogger Rick

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Tuesday, December 12, 2017

As many Blog readers are well aware, southern Florida is the home of the only breeding colony of Pumas east of the Mississippi River.............Known locally as "Florida Panthers", the 100-230 big Cats that now live there were on the verge of "blinking out" until Fish and Wildlife folks transplanted some Texas Pumas into the population, reinjuvenating the population with an array of new genes..............With automobile deaths mounting, the Pumas really have needed to find additional room to roam north of the Caloosahatchee River(north of Naples)...........And finally, trail cameras revealed this year the first evidence of a mother Puma and her cubs living north of this river..............Hopefully, the big cats continue to multiply, spreading out amongst the remaining undisturbed habitat that still exists in northern Florida and beyond

CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO VIEW FLORIDA PUMA IN THE BIG CYPRESS RESERVE

https://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/deer-hunter-films-his-up-close-look-at-rare-florida-panther

Deer hunter films his up-close look at rare Florida panther

Deer hunter films his up-close look at rare Florida panther
BY Ethan Shaw; DECEMBER 12 2017
Wander the pinelands and palm savannas of southwestern Florida's outback, and it isn't hard to sense the presence of the region's unique variety of mountain lion. The Florida panther goes about its deer-, hog- and rabbit-stalking ways here in wraithlike fashion, and it's a red-letter day when you actually clap eyes on one of these ropey, sand-coloured, palmetto-prowling big cats.

Florida female Puma(Florida Fish &Wildlife photo)

A deer hunter in the wild and woolly Big Cypress National Preserve abutting the Everglades landed one of those red-letter days recently – and managed to document his thrilling close encounter on video.
According to FOX 13, Fred Lehman was staked out in full camouflage along a primitive road in the Bear Island area when a panther padded past mere yards away. Upon sensing the man, the cat broke into a trot and then loped off (the typical reaction to a human being for a Florida panther – or just about any puma, for that matter), only to resume its sauntering patrol farther down the track.















Big Cypress National Preserve (which allows closely regulated hunting) is part of the core of the Florida panther's remaining range, and its lightly roaded backcountry – and that of adjoining public lands such as Everglades National Park, the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge and the Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park – offer critical refuge for the puma in otherwise heavily developed and human-thronged South Florida.
The kitten of the Female Florida Puma(Florida Fish & Wildlife photo)







As mountain lions vanished from eastern North America, the Florida panther clung to existence as a completely isolated relic, and as a result, it claims the lowest known genetic diversity of any puma population; panthers display evidence of inbreeding, most conspicuously kinked tails. The Big Cypress Swamp (which Big Cypress National Preserve partly encompasses) as well as the Okaloacoochee Slough to the north sheltered most of the last surviving panthers in the 1960s and '70s when they dwindled to fewer than two dozen.

 Caloosahatchee River was finally breeched by Pumas,,,,,,now there is a small breeding colony north of the river



















Today, conservation efforts have managed to nurse the panther population to perhaps as many as 230 adults; the gene pool got a boost in the 1990s when the US Fish and Wildlife Service trucked some mountain lions from Texas and released them into panther country (effectively mimicking the natural interchange that historically occurred when puma territory stretched continuously northward and westward from the Florida peninsula).







Efforts to bolster the cat's numbers, genetic diversity and range are complicated by the region's significant people-footprint. A disturbing number of panthers become roadkill on a regular basis – including along the two major paved highways that cleave Big Cypress, the Tamiami Trail (US Route 41) and "Alligator Alley" (Interstate 75) – although fencing and wildlife underpasses are showing signs of mitigating these dangers.

In Green(darker best habitat) potential Puma habitat north of the Big Cypress Swamp and the Caloosahatchee River
















While roadways and subdivisions cramp the panther's style the most, there's also a natural feature that's long proved a tricky obstacle to its northward dispersal in southwestern Florida: the Caloosahatchee River. Lately, though, there's been encouraging news from that front. Thanks to the protection of habitat corridors linking to the river, more and more male panthers – much more disposed to wander than females – have swum it; one showed up in Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp a few years back. And in the biggest news yet, a trail camera earlier this year captured photos of a female cat and a pair of kittens north of the river: the first panther litter documented north of the Caloosahatchee in more than four decades.
As for Lehman, FOX 13 reports he didn't end up bagging a deer on his Big Cypress hunt, "but leaving without one, he was satisfied to have spotted the panther and capture video to show to family and friends."

Monday, December 11, 2017

"Destroying predators and their prey to increase boreal caribou populations is a simplistic and relatively inexpensive approach employed by some managers hoping for a short-term victory for their single- species management program"............. "The notion of killing predators and prey, destroying an entire wildlife community, to save a species at risk, is not coherent with contemporary ecosystem and biodiversity conservation principles (Proulx and Brook 2017)"................"I believe that wolf killing programs were oversold, and such programs are misleading the public and the scientific community by shrouding the real cause of the decline of boreal caribou populations – habitat loss and disconnection".............. "On the subject of limiting factors on caribou populations, Leopold and Darling (1953) stated: "We cannot agree with the viewpoint…that the game program must be directed towards controlling the action of predators, both men and wolves, rather than improving the range"............... "To ignore range limitations for caribou is to ignore the crux of the problem”".............. "Hindsight indicates that Leopold and Darling were right"............. "Habitat loss and disconnection is the ultimate factor impacting on the survival of boreal caribou populations (Donovan et al. 2017)"............... "One may kill all the wolves and alternate prey of an ecosystem, and farm caribou in an enclosure in order to save the species (Alberta Government 2016) but without functional and accessible habitat, caribou are unlikely to persist over the long term"-----Dr. Gilbert Proulx, PhD, CWB

The Impact of Wolf Predation on Western Canada Boreal Woodland Caribou Populations: A Critical Review of the Evidence

Gilbert PROULX

Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd., 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8H 1W3, Canada. Email: gproulx@alphawildlife.ca
Dr. Gilbert Proulx, PhD, CWB
Director of Science
Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd.
VISIT MY NEW BLOG= WILDLIFE CONSERVATION– LET’S WISH FOR THE BEST IN 2016!

Editor-in-Chief
Canadian Wildlife Biology & Management

Cell: 780-953-6931
Fax: 780-417-0255

Was the impact


 of wolves on boreal

 caribou populations


 oversold?

In the past, it has been argued that changes in the forest age structure may compromise the ability of caribou to avoid other prey species and their predators because young forests support higher densities of alternate ungulate species such as moose (Rempel et al. 1997; Wiwchar and Mallory 2012) that in turn support higher predator densities and wolf size, leading to increased predation on caribou (Bergerud and Elliot 1986; Seip 1992). However, data show that caribou are not an important food item of wolves. Would a 15%- predation rate threaten a caribou population? It would likely threaten a population that has dwindled to a few animals, or when the females fail to reproduce. However, the majority of boreal caribou populations encompass hundreds of animals (Table 1) and ≥85% of the adult females usually are pregnant (Stuart-Smith et al. 1997; Rettie and Messier 1998; McLoughlin et al. 2003).












In the Little Smoky range where the population is relatively small (≤80 animals; Callaghan et al. 2011), it is unlikely that wolf predation compromised the caribou population. In fact, aerial surveys indicated that the population increased from 43 in the late 1990s to 74 in 2003 in the absence of any wolf control program (ASRD/ACA 2010). Obviously, predation did not impede the population from increasing in numbers, even though it was a slow growth. After killing nearly 1,000 wolves during a 7-year period, Hervieux et al. (2014) failed to generate growth in the Little Smoky caribou population. Clearly, something other than predation interfered with the growth of the population.

While methodological limitations and non-replicated treatments likely impacted on the ability of researchers to properly evaluate the mechanism of caribou population declines (Hayes et al. 2003; Brown et al. 2007; Proulx et al. 2017), I believe that wolves have been wrongly singled out as the proximate factor for the decline of boreal caribou populations. There is no doubt that wolves are opportunistic predators and they will kill caribou or any other prey they may encounter while hunting moose or deer. However, past researchers have not demonstrated that wolves caused the decline of boreal caribou populations. In the Little Smoky range, no studies have shown that wolves were limiting the caribou population. There were no recent studies on food habits, rates of predation or wolf densities (M. Besko, Director, Wildlife Management, Alberta, 8 February 2017, personal communication). As is the case for many other populations, conjectures about wolves impacting on caribou populations have been qualitative, anecdotal, and prejudicial (Proulx et al. 2017). Hebblewhite et al. (2006) also recognized that future research was needed on some of the assumptions underlying predator-prey models including multi-prey wolf numeric responses, wolf kill-rates of caribou, and caribou mortality by other predators. al. 1996; Hayes et al. 2003; Boutin 2017), any reduction of predator or competitor populations should also result in an increase of boreal caribou populations. 






Controlling bears (Ursus spp.) would likely reduce calf mortality (Rettie and Messier 1998; Latham et al. 2011; Pinard et al. 2012) and therefore contribute to population growth. Decreasing densities of moose, and thus provoking a decline in the density of predators, may also result in an increase in the survival of caribou (Serrouya et al. 2017). Eliminating beavers (Castor canadensis) would likely decrease incidental caribou kills by wolves in spring and summer (Latham et al. 2013). Destroying predators and their prey to increase boreal caribou populations is a simplistic and relatively inexpensive approach employed by some managers hoping for a short-term victory for their single- species management program. The notion of killing predators and prey, and destroy an entire wildlife community, to save a species at risk is not coherent with contemporary ecosystem and biodiversity conservation principles (Proulx and Brook 2017).

Thick, unbroken forest habitat, the key, to Caribou thriving










I believe that wolf killing programs were oversold, and such programs are misleading the public and the scientific community by shrouding the real cause of the decline of boreal caribou populations – habitat loss and disconnection. On the subject of limiting factors on caribou populations, Leopold and Darling (1953) stated: “We cannot agree with the viewpoint…that the game program must be directed towards controlling the action of predators, both men and wolves, rather than improving the range. To ignore range limitations for caribou is to ignore the crux of the problem”. Hindsight indicates that Leopold and Darling were right. Habitat loss and disconnection is the ultimate factor impacting on the survival of boreal caribou populations (Donovan et al. 2017). One may kill all the wolves and alternate prey of an ecosystem, and farm caribou in an enclosure in order to save the species (Alberta Government 2016) but without functional and accessible habitat, caribou are unlikely to persist over the long term. 

Boreal woodland caribou are now faced with climate change involving the drying of peatlands, and the “icing” of winter ranges where interludes of mild weather result in the formation of crusted snow and basal ice that restricts access to forage (Tyler 2010; Proulx 2015a). Where muskegs have been disconnected, caribou must venture on roads and through upland forests where they may be killed by predators or become victims of accidents (Proulx, personal observations). Human activities and infrastructures are the cause here, not the wolves.
Caribou are capable of adapting and coexisting in areas affected by human development provided that adequate habitat exists (Weclaw and Hudson 2004; O’Brien et al. 2006). By maintaining and interconnecting black spruce- tamarack muskegs and adjacent lichen-rich pine (Pinus spp.) stands, caribou can find food and security from adverse weather, predation, competition from other ungulates and accidents.














 The plea from wildlife professionals to conserve boreal woodland caribou habitat is based on scientific evidence, not on speculations or prejudices (Proulx et al. 2017). Developing a caribou recovery program based on habitat conservation is addressing the ultimate factor responsible for the decline of boreal caribou populations, and will solve issues associated with proximal mortality factors. Habitat conservation has been recommended by a plethora of wildlife biologists. Nearly 30 years ago, Edmonds (1988) recommended habitat conservation to ensure the future of the Little Smoky caribou population. Her recommendation was echoed by Cumming (1992), Weclaw and Hudson (2004), O’Brien et al. (2006), Proulx (2015a), Proulx and Powell (2016), and many others. We should no longer postpone the implementation of habitat conservation programs with the excuse that some caribou populations are presumably unsustainable, or their current range is highly fragmented and it may take another 40 years to bring back large intact forests. Caribou will persist if, and only if, we act now by conserving and further improving their habitats, and eliminating or at least minimizing habitat loss and alteration caused by industry (Proulx 2015b).

In conclusion, I believe that wolf predation on boreal woodland caribou was oversold by government agencies and some academics. Instead of scapegoating wolves for the demise of boreal woodland caribou populations, wildlife managers should implement a comprehensive caribou recovery program aimed at conserving, restoring, expanding and connecting critical habitats across landscapes (Proulx et al. 2017).



Sunday, December 10, 2017

Predator and prey dynamics are such that the prey animal often escapes the pursuing predator...............Like elite Hall of Fame baseball players, "hitting .300(3 of 10 chances getting a hit) is what the Wolverine, Wolf, Puma, Bobcat, Lynx, Black Bear, Griizly Bear, Fisher, Marten and Wolverine "hit" when stalking, chasing and catching prey.............In the video below, a Montana Glacier National Park Wolverine exhibits both its fleet swimming and running style in pursuit of a deer............While very quick and able to obtain speeds up to 30mph, the Wolverine fails to "make a catch", one of the 7 of 10 "swings and misses" that occur over a a course of a week in the wild

CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO VIEW THE SWIMMING AND RUNNING ABILITIES OF
THE WOLVERINE




The wolverine doesn't always get the deer, but the chase scene sure looks impressive

The wolverine doesn't always get the deer, but the chase scene sure looks impressive
BY ETHAN SHAW JULY 17 2017
Those who've seen a wolverine in the wild count themselves lucky. Those who've seen a wolverine hunting in the wild – well, that's close to snowball-in-hell territory.
Over the Fourth of July weekend up in the Beaverhead Mountains along the Continental Divide in far southwestern Montana, a group of right-place-right-time onlookers got to witness this once-in-a-million sight – and catch it on film, to boot!
The video, taken near Ajax Mountain and posted to YouTube by Whitney Beckley, shows a wolverine making an honest college try for a mule-deer fawn. Its efforts see the lean mustelid – one of the biggest members of the weasel family – swimming a mountain lake, then coming ashore in an apparent effort to cut the fawn off.

Upon the approach of the doe across a snowfield, the wolverine lopes upslope and engages in a bit of a face-off with the adult deer before retreating. Thanks perhaps to its mother's interference, the swimming fawn manages to escape.
It's a remarkable scene, partly for the wolverine athleticism it reveals. Cannonballing into the lake, paddling full-tilt, dashing along the shoreline snowpack, bounding up a rocky mountainside – you can't help but be impressed by the big weasel's venison-inspired peppiness.

Then again, this is a carnivore famous for its dogged strength. In what may as well serve as a dictionary definition of "hardcore", one GPS-collared male wolverine climbed the loftiest peak in Montana's Glacier National Park, 10,466-foot Mount Cleveland, in the middle of winter, powering about a vertical mile up a steep headwall to the top in a cool 90 minutes.
The wolverine in Beckley's video also boasts distinctive colouration, its creamy underside extending across much of its right foreleg.
While commonly thought of as scavengers, wolverines can also be effective hunters of young ungulates such as this deer fawn. In one study in northern British Columbia, the mustelids were the most important predator (in a carnivore guild that also included gray wolves and grizzly bears) of newborn woodland caribou during calving season.












In winter drifts, when its oversized snowshoe paws give it a mobility advantage, the wolverine will occasionally try for full-grown hoofed quarry: earlier this year, equally rare footage out of northern Norway showed a tenacious attack on an adult reindeer in a driving blizzard. And a few years back, onlookers managed to film a wolverine killing a caribou on Alaska's North Slope.
It hopefully goes without saying, but such intense-to-watch dramas are simply the food web in play: wolverines being wolverines, which means taking advantage of any meal opportunity they can.
And as this latest video from the Montana Rockies suggests, the wolverine most certainly doesn't always get her deer

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Many biologists and Ecological Historians claim that prior to the 1850 Gold Rush, California had the highest density of Grizzly Bears of anywhere in the lower 48 States..............."When Americans began to settle in the area, they would capture Grizzlies for a sporting event that they found fascinating"................. "The vaqueros would haul the bruin into camp to fight a vicious horse-goring snorting bull"............"The resulting gory spectacle delighted the spectators who had come to make money on the battle of the beasts and the betting was high"........... "The bear, which had two of his paws tied, crouched as low as it could, sometimes even digging a hole beneath him so that he might bring the bull down to a position vulnerable to his teeth and claws"..........."The bull would try to get the bear up on its hinds legs so it could spear it with his horns".........."The fight continued until one or both of the animals were dead".........."When the West’s new financial capital in San Francisco opened, the money brokers adopted “bear” and “bull” investment language in that the “bear” speculator would hold off buying until prices fell to his hoped for advantage"................ "On the other hand, the “bull” speculator would buy stock, confident that its price would continue to rise and increase in value"............... "These terms eventually found their way into our modern stock exchanges, "bull makets and bear markets"

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=http://santamariatimes.com/lifestyles/columnist/shirley_contreras/shirley-contreras-encounters-with-grizzlies-began-in/article_d828de87-c616-544f-84a2-4e1b92497405.html&ct=ga&cd=CAEYBCoSMTIyNTY2ODUzMjkxNzI0MTc4Mho1NmQxZTdmMTllOGY5OTkxOmNvbTplbjpVUw&usg=AFQjCNH9g4X7iAU7ygfZmfboLLOR-r5fOQ

 European encounters with grizzlies in California began in 1769


The first recorded encounters with grizzlies by the Europeans took place on the famed Portola expedition in 1769, the first recorded exploration by land of the present-day state of California. One of the place names that include the Spanish word for bear “oso” is our own Oso Flaco (skinny bear) Lake, which traces its name back to that first expedition.






The early settlers in the Santa Maria Valley had more than their share of problems with these wild beasts that were killing their calves and colts and, in general, causing much fear to the Spanish settlers.
The typical rancho vaquero, who rode a horse as if he grew up on the animal’s back, roped horses and bears as easily as he could don his hat.
Even though roping grizzlies was considered to be a sport, it was dangerous and not recommended for the novice. Since a wounded grizzly fears nothing, the vaquero’s life often depended on his own expertise as well as the speed of the horse he rode.









When Americans began to settle in the area, bull and bear fights became sporting events that proved to be both horrifying and fascinating to the Americanos.
After a grizzly was captured by the vaqueros, it was hauled into camp to fight a vicious horse-goring snorting bull.
The resulting gory spectacle delighted the spectators who had come to make money on the battle of the beasts and the betting was high.
The bear, which had two of his paws tied, crouched as low as it could, sometimes even digging a hole beneath him so that he might bring the bull down to a position vulnerable to his teeth and claws.









In the meantime, the bull tried to get the bear up on his hind legs so that it could spear it with his horns. The fight continued until one or both of the beasts were dead.
Later, when the West’s new financial capital in San Francisco opened, the money brokers adopted “bear” and “bull” investment language in that the “bear” speculator would hold off buying until prices fell to his hoped for advantage. On the other hand, the “bull” speculator would buy stock, confident that its price would continue to rise and increase in value.
These terms eventually found their way back to the American Stock Exchange.








However, grizzlies (urus horriblilis) were dangerous animals, and much feared by the early settlers.
One story that has made the rounds is of Benjamin Foxen having a bear chained to a tree in front of his adobe.
When the stagecoach came through, the passengers were fascinated by it. How the bear happened to be chained to the tree, or who released it and how, are questions no one seemed to know the answer to.
Francis Branch, owner of the Arroyo Grande Rancho, was once infuriated by a grizzly that was killing both cows and calves near his ranch house.

The current Grizzly Bear range in the lower 48 States









One day, when another cow was attacked, he decided to tackle this problem head-on and get rid of the grizzly.
Since bears were known to return to the sight of a kill for one last meal, Branch dug a hole near the dead cow.
After filling the hole with brush and covering it with heavy timbers, he and a friend jumped down into this pit and waited with their rifles, ready to shoot this bothersome cattle killer when it returned.
After crouching in the pit for some hours, the men caught sight of an immense bear and her cub approaching the dead cow.
Carefully poking their guns through the concealed cover of the pit, the hunters fired shots, but instead of hitting the mother bear, they killed the cub.
The pitiful cries of the dying cub so enraged the mother that she ran in circles around her dead cub, looking up into the trees and tearing great chunks of bark and wood from them with her long claws and teeth, trying to destroy whatever it was that had killed her cub.
The two frightened men who were huddled in the pit didn’t dare make a noise. They spent the entire night and half of the next day crouched in their narrow quarters hoping the bear wouldn’t find them.
When the bear finally went away, they made a dash for home.
Years later, when Branch was reminiscing, he said, “Right then and there was when I decided to always hunt bears above the ground. It’s safer.”
Because of the hunting and killing, bull and bear fights and poison-laced animal fat being left outside for the bears to eat, grizzlies became a rarity on the Central Coast in the 1870s.
Reportedly, the last reported grizzly bear was shot in 1922.
However, to this day, occasional reports of bears being sighted appear in the news.
Shirley Contreras lives in Orcutt and writes for the Santa Maria Valley Historical Society. She can be contacted at 623-8193 or at shirleycontreras2@yahoo.com. Her book, “The Good Years,” a selection of stories she’s written for the Santa Maria Times since 1991, is on sale at the Santa Maria Valley Historical Society, 616 S. Broadway.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Many of us associate the Wolverine with its fierce, never-say-die disposition, its pound-for-pound strength, tenacity and ability to stand toe-to-toe with the biggest Grizzlies, Wolves and Pumas in North America when claiming a meal............Most of us do not associate the Wolverine with the tender loving care of motherhood,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Below, as you click on the link, you will find mother Wolverine moving her kits from one of her snow den caverns(apparently melting water endangering the kits) to another den that is more safe and secure..........Don't mess with "Mama Wolverine"---She will defend her kits to the death!


CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO WATCH TWO VIDEOS OF MOTHER WOLVERINE
MOVING HER KITS FROM A MELTING DEN TO A DRYER DEN

https://www.earthtouchnews.com/in-the-field/film-and-photo/wolverine-babies-filmed-in-the-wild-for-the-first-time

Wolverine babies filmed in the wild for the first time

Wolverine babies filmed in the wild for the first time
BY earth touch news; FEBRUARY 29 2016
Wildlife filmmaker Andrew Manske’s five-year mission to track down one of the world's most elusive carnivores hit a high note with a decidedly unintimidating sound: the soft cries of a baby. A baby wolverine, that is.

The squeaks emanating from a den hidden beneath deep snow were the precursor to one seriously adorable wolverine relocation. Manske believes the amazing footage, captured as part of his new documentary Wolverine: Ghost of the Northern Forest, is the first to show a wild wolverine with her kits.














The Canadian cinematographer set his sights on filming the mysterious animals after coming across camera trap footage of them lumbering through the forests of Alberta. What followed was a challenging quest to track down wolverines in their rugged and remote stomping ground – and a series of long and chilly (and often fruitless) stakeouts in wildlife hides.
Although they're widespread across the Northern Hemisphere, wolverines (Gluo gulo) are among its least studied carnivores – and their mostly nocturnal habits and often inaccessible territories make them difficult for both scientists and filmmakers to find.
To help him with his tracking task, Manske reached
out to experts from the The Wolverine Project – the
most wide-ranging study of the animals ever carried
out in North America.











“It was like Christmas morning,” Manske
tells the Edmonton Journal of the excitement of capturing
 his very first footage.
Much like Africa's honey badgers, wolverines are fearsome
 creatures that punch above their weight. They might
 look like small bears with bushy tails, but they're
actually the largest members of the weasel family –
and they come armed with powerful jaws and large
teeth. Although they often scavenge (rumours abound
of clashes with wolves and grizzlies over carcasses),
wolverines are also skilled hunters capable of taking
down surprisingly large prey.














Come breeding season, females excavate dens in the
snow, and each litter is typically made up of two to three
 white-furred kits, which are born blind and will stay with
the mother for some time. Wolverine family dynamics is
 an area that Manske's film project helped shed new light
 on.
"We started learning that male wolverines might play a
 bigger role in raising their young," Manske
tells CBC News. The "fatherly" duties caught on camera
included regular visits to the den, as well as some
scent-marking action at the dens to ward off other
wolverines.
You can watch the trailer for Manske's documentary
below (or visit his website for more about his
 wolverine-tracking crusade).

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

The Greater Roadrunner(made famous in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoons) is resident from central and southern California, eastwards to south-western Missouri and western Louisiana, and southwards into central Mexico..........While certainly capable of flying(see the video in the article below of the Roadrunner grabbing a hummingbird), these omnivores rely on their "Flash-like" speed (can accelerate up to 27mph) to capture and dine on insects, lizards, snakes, mice, scorpions, tarantulas, hummingbirds, quail, sparrows, fruits and seeds. ........The hunter becomes the hunted when Coyotes, hawks, house cats, skunks and raccoons make a meal of the Roadrunner..........Living up to 7-8 years in the wild, they are nonmigratory, periodically succumbing to icy weather in a particularly cold Winter

CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO SEE THE OUTSTANDING SPEED AND KILLING PROWESS
OF THE GREATER ROADRUNNER-SNATCHING A HUMMINGBIRD WHILE IT DINES AT A BIRDFEEDER

https://www.earthtouchnews.com/in-the-field/backyard-wildlife/even-an-airborne-hummingbird-isnt-safe-from-this-hungry-roadrunner

Even an airborne hummingbird isn't safe from this hungry roadrunner

Even an airborne hummingbird isn't safe from this hungry roadrunner
BY David Moscato; MARCH 03 2017

If you're a hummingbird, a roadrunner might not seem like something to worry about. After all, your famous aerial manoeuvrability is no match for a mostly flightless speedster way down there on the ground. Right?
Roadrunner capturing a bird


















Wrong. It turns out the roadrunner does not always stay on the road.

This quick bit of predator-on-prey action unfolded in the California backyard of Roy 
 Dunn, a long-time birdwatcher and wildlife photographer.

Dunn has a fondness for photographing hummingbirds, and his high-speed cameras are perfect for capturing the swift-moving fliers. But occasionally, another hungry bird turns up near his feeders: the greater roadrunner. 


















After watching the ground cuckoos jumping up at the hummingbirds (and even catching them occasionally), Dunn decided to set out a camera to see if he could record a catch. After a few hours of waiting, he got his wish.

"He missed quite a few before he nailed one," Dunn said. According to Audubon, who recently featured the short clip on their website, such hummingbird-hunting behaviour has been observed before, but successful catches like this one are rarely recorded. 

Roadrunners spend much of their time zipping across the harsh, dry environments of southern North America like tiny, toothless velociraptors, snatching up allmanner of creepy-crawly prey, from spiders and scorpions to centipedes and snakes. But they're not strictly carnivorous: they'll also happily eat cactus fruit (you can't be too picky in the desert!).

Roadrunner capturing a frog



















Without talons or a tearing beak to dispatch their struggling food, the birds opt for bashing their meal against the ground until it stops resisting. If they catch something big, like a rattlesnake, roadrunners take their time: they'll swallow the prey bit by bit, with parts of it protruding from the beak and the rest slowly digesting in their stomach.

True to their name, roadrunners stick mainly to the ground, where they can run up to 27 kmph (17mph). But even though they don't do much flying, they still have the flight-worthy tools of their airborne ancestors: powerful back legs for getting off the ground, a long tail for aerial balance, and strong wings for gaining some height and slowing their descent. In Dunn's video, you can see the roadrunner make brief but beautiful use of all of these avian gifts.
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WARNER BROS. MADE BOTH THE ROADRUNNER AND THE COYOTE FAMOUS

Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner
Background information
Wile E. Coyote (also known simply as "The Coyote") and the Road Runner are a duo of characters from the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. In the cartoons, the Coyote repeatedly attempts to catch and subsequently eat the Road Runner, a fast-running ground bird, but is never successful. Instead of his species' animal instincts, the Coyote uses absurdly complex contraptions (sometimes in the manner of Rube Goldberg) and elaborate plans to pursue his prey, resulting in his devices comically backfiring with the Coyote often getting injured in slapstick fashion. One running gag involves the Coyote trying in vain to shield himself with a little parasolagainst a great falling boulder that is about to crush him


Wile E. Coyote
Looney Tunes character
First appearance
Fast and Furry-ous(September 17, 1949)
Created by
Silent (1949–1952)
Mel Blanc 
(1952–1986, only in Wile E. and Bugs Bunny shorts, andAdventures of the Road Runner)
Joe Alaskey 
(1991–2006, 2011)
Maurice LaMarche 
(1994–2008)
Dee Bradley Baker 
(2003)
Daran Norris 
(2014)
J. P. Karliak 
(2015; Wabbit - A Looney Tunes Production)[1]
Information
Aliases
The Coyote
Species
Gender
Male
Nationality
American
Road Runner
Looney Tunes character
First appearance
Fast and Furry-ous(September 17, 1949)
Created by
Paul Julian (1949–1994)
Mel Blanc 
(1968–1986)
Dee Bradley Baker 
(2003–2006, 2014)
Joe Alaskey 
(2011)
Information
Species
Gender
Male
Nationality
American