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Coyotes-Wolves-Cougars.blogspot.com

Grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, cougars/ mountain lions,bobcats, wolverines, lynx, foxes, fishers and martens are the suite of carnivores that originally inhabited North America after the Pleistocene extinctions. This site invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on that suite of native animals (predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our "Wild America" as well as subjective commentary from expert and layman alike. All of the above being revealed and discussed with the underlying goal of one day seeing our Continent rewilded.....Where big enough swaths of open space exist with connective corridors to other large forest, meadow, mountain, valley, prairie, desert and chaparral wildlands.....Thereby enabling all of our historic fauna, including man, to live in a sustainable and healthy environment. - Blogger Rick

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Thursday, April 26, 2012

Vegetation is important to both forest and stream ecosystems.For terrestrial wildlife, understory vegetation provides important habitat characteristics, which include but are not limited to, providing cover and security, habitat for prey, and a safe travel corridor.The lack of habitat found in dense second-growth forests or disturbed harvested sites can result in wildlife, such as deer, wolves, bears and cougars, coming into the margins of nearby communities......There has been a dramatic increase in large mammals and ungulates making their way into unnatural terrain over the last few years.We are currently experiencing a high volume of wolf activity in our neighbourhoods. This increase is relative to habitat degradation caused by industrial operations and development, and a lack of attention to areas affected by historical logging......Parks Canada wildlife biologist, Bob Hansen states, "As always I think it is food driven. If they have an abundant and dependable localized food source then their need to travel outside these areas diminishes significantly." We can support diverse and healthy ecosystems within our woodlands by increasing food availability, which will help keep our communities safe by working to limit predator and people interactions.


Habitat issues for local wolves


Westerly News; canada.com

Imagine walking into a grocery store and all the shelves and aisles are barren and bleak. Where has the food gone? Would you return to that store or would you look for your groceries elsewhere?
This is what it is like for the terrestrial wildlife of our coast when they are in some forests that were harvested between the 1950s and 1980s, using historical methods like clearcutting.

Many of these areas, like parts of the Kennedy Flats, were later replanted as second-growth forests with Douglas-fir.Unfortunately, Douglasfir is better suited to well drained soils and is considered offsite and ecologically inappropriate for most of the Kennedy Flats.n these second-growth forests, trees usually grow close together and are dense, with little to no gaps in the canopy.
This canopy cover limits the amount of light reaching the forest floor, which inhibits plant growth and diversity, creating a dark, un-vegetated forest.

Wolves in mature forest




Vegetation is important to both forest and stream ecosystems.For terrestrial wildlife, understory vegetation provides important habitat characteristics, which include but are not limited to, providing cover and security, habitat for prey, and a safe travel corridor.The lack of habitat found in dense second-growth forests or disturbed harvested sites can result in wildlife, such as deer, wolves, bears and cougars, coming into the margins of nearby communities.

Grizzly in mature riparian habitat
Central Westcoast Forest Society (CWFS) and Pacific Rim National Park Reserve are working together to restore the second-growth forest in the riparian area.The riparian zone is the area adjacent to streams. It offers many benefits to wildlife, from providing travel corridors for safe movement between habitat types to promoting the dispersal of wildlife populations.

Although it can take hundreds of years for a forest to acquire old-growth characteristics, there are silviculture treatments like thinning, creating snags and gaps, which can accelerate the process. For 15 years, CWFS restoration crews have used silviculture treatments and planted native vegetation and conifer seedlings to rebuild the biodiversity of the riparian areas that feed wildlife.The goal is to revitalize these areas to resemble the neighbouring old growth forest and to allow nature to do the rest. As vegetation returns, the hope is that species such as deer, wolf, bear and cougar will follow.

Puma in established grassland
There has been a dramatic increase in large mammals and ungulates making their way into unnatural terrain over the last few years.We are currently experiencing a high volume of wolf activity in our neighbourhoods. This increase is relative to habitat degradation caused by industrial operations and development, and a lack of attention to areas affected by historical logging.

Parks Canada wildlife biologist, Bob Hansen states, "As always I think it is food driven. If they have an abundant and dependable localized food source then their need to travel outside these areas diminishes significantly." We can support diverse and healthy ecosystems within the park by increasing food availability, which will help keep our communities safe by working to limit predator and people interactions.

Local organizations, including Central Westcoast Forest Society, complete valuable work as they restore forest and stream habitats by hand and saw. The resulting replenishment of the forest may provide an increase to the 'groceries' local wildlife need to thrive.

 

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