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Grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, cougars/ mountain lions,bobcats, wolverines, lynx, foxes, fishers and martens are the suite of carnivores that originally inhabited North America after the Pleistocene extinctions. This site invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on that suite of native animals (predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our "Wild America" as well as subjective commentary from expert and layman alike. All of the above being revealed and discussed with the underlying goal of one day seeing our Continent rewilded.....Where big enough swaths of open space exist with connective corridors to other large forest, meadow, mountain, valley, prairie, desert and chaparral wildlands.....Thereby enabling all of our historic fauna, including man, to live in a sustainable and healthy environment. - Blogger Rick

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

While there was wild speculation about the Florida Puma recovery plan being scrapped and abandoned by the USFW Service, we learn from our friends Carmel Severson and Chris Spatz that while the team of biologists that drafted the 2008 recovery plan is being disbanded, a new recovery team is being put in place to fulfill the mission of the 2008 plan................So the article below "speaks with fork tongue"

Recovery of Florida Panthers jeopardized?
A snippet of data came across the news section of the Mountain Lion Foundation’s website recently: the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced that it is stepping down from its watchdog role over the endangered Florida Panther, leaving protection of Florida’s state animal in the hands of Florida government. This is troublesome news as the state has a history of siding with habitat-destroying developers over the plants and animals that exist there.
The USFWS withdrew from panther protection in order to “streamline” the permitting process for development projects, leaving Florida with the expectation that the state must adopt the same priorities (such as fracking in the Big Cypress region). It is feared that these actions and attitudes will influence other states to adopt the same disregard for wildlife.
Could this be the start of a nationwide undoing of the Federal Endangered Species Act?

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