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Grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, cougars/ mountain lions,bobcats, wolverines, lynx, foxes, fishers and martens are the suite of carnivores that originally inhabited North America after the Pleistocene extinctions. This site invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on that suite of native animals (predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our "Wild America" as well as subjective commentary from expert and layman alike. All of the above being revealed and discussed with the underlying goal of one day seeing our Continent rewilded.....Where big enough swaths of open space exist with connective corridors to other large forest, meadow, mountain, valley, prairie, desert and chaparral wildlands.....Thereby enabling all of our historic fauna, including man, to live in a sustainable and healthy environment. - Blogger Rick

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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

A Study conducted by THE CENTRE FOR RESPONSIBLE TOURISM(funded by conservation Org Tides Canada) concludes that Bear watching and related endeavors generates 11 times the revenue and employed 499 more people than Trophy Hunting did for British Columbia, Canada in 2012...................If in fact the study is not skewed toward an environmental bias(note the funding of it), it is time to stop killing Griz up North and never allow it to resume in the Greater Yellowstone

There is more money in looking at bears than there is in shooting them — 12 times more to be exact, according to a new study.
The study conducted by the Centre for Responsible Tourism, a research institute at Stanford University in Washington, D.C., and funded by the conservation organization Tides Canada, concluded that bear-related ecotourism is exponentially more profitable than trophy hunting.
"We found that the bear viewing is generating 12 times more in visitor spending than is bear hunting, and over 11 times more in direct revenue for the B.C. province," said lead researcher Martha Honey.
Ecotourism, including bear viewing, has grown rapidly over the past decade on B.C.'s Central Coast, said Honey. People from around the world come to the Great Bear Rainforest in the hopes of seeing black, grizzly and kermode bears in their natural habitat.
The report concluded trophy hunting, on the other hand, is on the decline, said Honey.
Grizzly, Great Bear Rainforest (Cal Towle) (bears)
The Centre for Responsible Tourism is calling on the B.C. government to reconsider its hunting policies in light of these findings.
A comparison of the number of jobs generated by each industry also points to the need for a policy change, she said. Researchers found companies involved in bear viewing employed 510 people in 2012, while 11 people worked for guide outfitters in the same year.
Another concern, said Honey, is how much money the province is spending each year on complex hunting regulations.
"It seemed to us quite clear that the government is spending more to sort of manage and oversee hunting than it is earning from revenue from hunting," she said.
But, a Ministry of Forests spokesperson said the ministry is disappointed in the report, claiming the study creates an artificial divide between bear viewing and hunting, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive activities.

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