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Coyotes-Wolves-Cougars.blogspot.com

Grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, cougars/ mountain lions,bobcats, wolverines, lynx, foxes, fishers and martens are the suite of carnivores that originally inhabited North America after the Pleistocene extinctions. This site invites research, commentary, point/counterpoint on that suite of native animals (predator and prey) that inhabited The Americas circa 1500-at the initial point of European exploration and subsequent colonization. Landscape ecology, journal accounts of explorers and frontiersmen, genetic evaluations of museum animals, peer reviewed 20th and 21st century research on various aspects of our "Wild America" as well as subjective commentary from expert and layman alike. All of the above being revealed and discussed with the underlying goal of one day seeing our Continent rewilded.....Where big enough swaths of open space exist with connective corridors to other large forest, meadow, mountain, valley, prairie, desert and chaparral wildlands.....Thereby enabling all of our historic fauna, including man, to live in a sustainable and healthy environment. - Blogger Rick

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Almost unheard of is a population of native animal that is found in both Canada and the USA having a larger population in "the land of the free and the home of the brave"................With still vast Boreal forest reserves(despite oil and mineral exploitation) and a fraction of the human population of the USA, Canada is a stronghold for Grizzlies, Gray and Eastern Wolves, Wolverines and Caribou----All of these creatures just barely hanging onto life in the lower 48....................Interestingly enough, the common Gray Fox found across the USA is in fact just hanging onto life in Canada, with perhaps 100 individual animals in existence................."Prior to European contact, the Gray Fox is considered to have been “not an uncommon mammal”(regularly found) in southern Ontario, based on bones recovered from aboriginal settlements:,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. "However, it was extirpated at about the time of European contact, and was not reported again in Canada, until the 1890s".......Researchers are not certain why such a long disappearance when the USA went through the same human explosion and resulting deforestation as Canada did starting in AD1500........ "As the 20th century dawned, Gray Foxes began to be reported irregularly from Manitoba to New Brunswick".................... "Today, there are two known Canadian sub-populations: on Pelee Island in Lake Erie (breeding confirmed); and in northwestern Ontario (Rainy River District east to Dorian, breeding evidence)"........................ "In addition there is weak evidence of breeding in southern Quebec"................................ "The reappearance of the Gray Fox in Canada over the last century is thought to be entirely due to natural dispersal of Gray Foxes from the U.S".................... "Population data is lacking for this species, but the Canadian population is estimated to contain fewer than 110 mature individuals"................A full summary of what is trying to be done to increase the population by the Canadian Ministry of the Environment can be accessed by clicking on the link below

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiHwrS57NLTAhXj24MKHXWiC5sQFghDMAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sararegistry.gc.ca%2Fvirtual_sara%2Ffiles%2Fplans%2Frs_grey_fox_e_proposed.pdf&usg=AFQjCNFzucK-UZpCklWBLj2gp9ib--qEAA

Recovery Strategy for the Grey Fox (Urocyon 
cinereoargenteus) in Canada

 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of
Environment and Climate Change, 2017

Executive Summary 

The Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a medium sized mammal in the dog family
and is found from southern Canada to northern Venezuela and Colombia. It is similar in
size and appearance to the Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes), but has a stockier build and black
tail tip in contrast to the Red Fox’s white tail tip. The Gray Fox is the only canid4
 in North America that can climb trees, allowing it to hunt, den and rest in trees.

The Gray Fox is the only Fox species able to climb trees(Red Foxes are not climbers)






















Red foxes(below) are one of Canada’s most widespread mammals, found in all provinces and territories-Not a tree climber and very comfortable around human farms and neighborhoods









The Gray Fox is listed as Threatened on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act
(SARA). Prior to European contact, the Gray Fox is considered to have been “not an
uncommon mammal” in southern Ontario, based on bones recovered from aboriginal
settlements. However, it was extirpated at about the time of European contact, and was
not reported again in Canada, until the 1890s. Since that time, Gray Foxes have been
reported irregularly from Manitoba to New Brunswick. Most records are considered to
be non-breeding (not mature) individuals, dispersing in search of new territories, but
there are two known Canadian sub-populations: on Pelee Island in Lake Erie (breeding
confirmed); and in northwestern Ontario (Rainy River District east to Dorian, breeding
evidence). In addition there is weak evidence of breeding in southern Quebec. The
reappearance of the Gray Fox in Canada over the last century is thought to be entirely
due to natural dispersal of Gray Foxes from the U.S.. Population data is lacking for this
species, but the Canadian population is estimated to contain fewer than 110 mature
individuals.


The Gray Fox






The most significant threat facing the Gray Fox in Canada is hunting and trapping.
Gray Foxes are incidentally captured and sometimes killed during legal trapping
activities targeted at other species. Due to lack of good population data, the impact of
this source of mortality on the population is difficult to assess, but it is rated as a high
level threat because it has the potential to limit the natural establishment of new
breeding populations of Gray Foxes in Canada. The impact of disease and road
mortality on the Gray Fox in Canada is unknown.

The recovery of the Gray Fox is considered feasible. The population and distribution
objectives for Gray Fox are to 1) maintain the sub-population on Pelee Island, 2)
maintain the northwestern Ontario sub-population and support natural increase of
abundance and distribution in this region, and 3) maintain the current distribution of
Gray Fox in Canada and support natural establishment and expansion of any newly
identified or newly established sub-populations of Gray Fox in Canada. Broad
strategies to be taken to address the threats to the survival and recovery of the species
are presented in the section on Strategic Direction for Recovery (Section 6.2).

1 comment:

Bill Leikam - The Fox Guy said...

Interesting that the gray fox has been sighted in Manitoba and as far east as New Brunswick. All of the previous literature only had them in Ontario and Quebec. So, now I need to change my public presentations to fit this expanse. Gray foxes are not found in the Rocky Mountains and in broad patches out on the Great Plains. No one has an explanation for that.
Sincerely,
Bill Leikam – The Fox Guy
Urban Wildlife Research Project
UrbanWildlifeResearchProject.com